Curriculum

 

"Where Childhood Matters"

Making memories 

Here at Nafferton Primary School each child is valued for what they bring to the school and community.  A child needs to be allowed to be a child, creating memories for life.  We are committed to developing the whole child.  We offer an education that is rooted in the traditions and values of England with a spirit of tolerance and respect for the individual.  Our children will have the opportunity to be creative, to be physically active and to be academically challenged.  Aspirations and expectations are high for our children to ensure they become active, responsible and caring members of the school and society.

Intent, Implematation & Impact (III)

Reading

At Nafferton, children read individually, in small groups and as a whole class.  A variety of different genres, both fiction and non-fiction, are chosen at an appropriate level of ability for each child. As well as being able to read the text, children are encouraged to discuss the book, expressing their individual opinions of the content. More able readers will be asked to compare the themes and speculate on the tone of different texts.

We use a range of literature from the Oxford Reading Tree scheme.  We also encourage children to select their own books from the school library and welcome suggestions regarding the texts they would like to read in future.  We closely link high-quality books with our whole school themes and our “Recommended Reads” expose children to a variety of texts. Reading is rewarded through our reading wall and bookmark scheme which is monitored by our Year 6 House Captains. As well as this, children’s reading achievements are recognised and celebrated through termly tea parties with the Head Teacher.

Reading is a valuable, lifelong skill that intersects all areas of the curriculum. We develop our pupils through independent and shared reading as well as cross-curricular sessions which empower them to find pleasure in reading.

 

Phonics

In Foundation and KS1, we use Letters and Sounds to teach systematic-synthetic phonics. Children progress through Phases 1 – 6 and learn to recognise phonemes and write graphemes. As children progress, they begin to learn alternative pronunciations of phonemes and the various graphemes which can represent these sounds. Within each Phase, children learn to read and write various tricky words, high frequency words and common exception words. We use a range of materials to supplement the teaching of phonics and both practical and written approaches to support learning to ensure the best possible outcomes are achieved.  At Nafferton, we recognise that every child has a different starting point and teachers tailor methods and interventions to meet children’s needs to ensure progress.

For more information about the Phases and principles of Letters and Sounds please visit the DfE website by following the link below:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/190599/Letters_and_Sounds_-_DFES-00281-2007.pdf

 

Writing

Each term, we have a new whole school topic which provides many exciting writing opportunities and exposure to high quality books. Children learn through a cross-curricular approach with high quality book focuses. From this, teachers teach a range of genres in imaginative ways which inspire children to write. As well as this, we believe that writing for purpose ensures that writing is meaningful and we encourage children to take part in these exciting opportunities. Some of these include:

  • Writing to the Brazilian Embassy about the effects of deforestation
  • Writing a review about Nafferton Primary School for the Parliamentary Review
  • Partaking in Water Explorers
  • Job applications for positions in school e.g. house captains, play buddies, librarians
  • Writing to authors and creating new characters for books
  • Responding to letters from fairytale characters

 

Spelling

We teach spelling through the Rising Stars scheme. This ensures progression throughout the school and that National Curriculum objectives are met. Each week children are given a list of 10 spellings. These spellings are integrated into daily teaching and teachers use a range of practical and written methods for spellings to be learnt.